In this season (and greater time) of sifting the wheat from the chaff, and restoring the sacred to its rightful place in both the mundane and the lofty, it’s a fine time, too, to resurface this previous Sophia’s Children post on Restoring the World’s Lost Heart.

Big Love and Happy Equinox,
Jamie

Sophia's Children

Mary Magdalene with the Alabaster Jar, by Anthony Frederick Sandys. Mary Magdalene with the Alabaster Jar, by Anthony Frederick Sandys.

“In a time lacking in truth and certainty and filled with anguish and despair, no woman should be shamefaced in attempting to give back to the world, through her work, some portion of its lost heart.”

~ Louise Bogan, American Poet, and the fourth Poet Laureate to the Library of Congress (1897-1970)

Surely, if news headlines are any clue, the world has lost a good portion of its heart, and calls out for the restoration of its lost portions.

Restoring some portion of the world’s lost heart is the point of the Hero’s (or Heroine’s) Journey, or at least one of the shining facets of The Journey.

Bridge in the Woods (1885-86), by  Rafail Sergeevich-Levitsky (1847–1940). Image courtesy WikiCommons. Bridge in the Woods (1885-86), by Rafail Sergeevich-Levitsky (1847–1940). Image courtesy WikiCommons.

Those who’ve walked (or, like me, stumbled and crawled for a fair bit of) The Journey will know the truth in what Joseph Campbell…

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