Kitten, 1900, by William Clarke Wontner.
Kitten, 1900, by William Clarke Wontner.

I’m happy to share this lovely musing from Nimue Brown on ‘Redefining Luxury’.

One part of reclaiming our mojo in various areas of life involves reclaiming and redefining words (and the corresponding actions) that have been co-opted and put in service of the Rat Race.

By reflecting on and reclaiming our own definition of ‘luxury’, we’re also centering in on what truly has value and worth to us (rather than what we’re brainwashed to value regardless of whether it contributes to our own and the collective wellbeing).

This is a natural question for those of us exploring the Taurean-Venus ‘mystery school’ (aka Taurus Rising) in this lifetime, since the soul-expression of Taurus is to explore, define, and take root in what’s truly of worth and what expresses the deepest and truest of all values (vs. the more superficial and transient ones defined by consumption-driven culture).

But regardless of the soul explorations and adventures we’re immersing in, these are questions that invite us all to come home to what matters most to us.

What has value, what feels (and is) of real value and worth to us, and in what simple, often-overlooked ways might we rediscover real luxury and decadence?

Many of my ‘Top 10’ (or 20, or …) simple and rich luxuries would overlap the list that Nimue shares (you’ll find the link to her post below).

Confidences, 1869, by Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema.
Confidences, 1869, by Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema.

I’ve added another recent discovery in the comments on Nimue’s post — going ‘minimal or sans electricity after sundown at least several (or more) days a week.

I’ve found that, as much as I love and appreciate technology, this practice feels truly decadent in our over-tronned times!

Another simple-pleasures practice of mine in recent years has been to reclaim the wisdom of my wise woman/man ancestors by learning the ‘wild plant allies’ around me and their nutritional and medicinal gifts to us. Truly rich, and very abundant.

My ‘about Jamie‘ musing includes more of my own appreciated, simple and rich luxuries.

Thanks to Nimue for this lovely post and invitation to reflection and the power of redefining and reclaiming ‘luxury’. You might also want to check out some of her other posts, like “What’s it Worth?”

How about you?

What simple pleasures and natural luxuries have you rediscovered or renewed your appreciation for?

Big Love,
Jamie

Druid Life

Western culture tends to define luxury around items that cost a lot of money, or at a pinch, experiences that cost a lot of money (luxury holidays, mostly). ‘The Good Stuff’ is all about objects, and to afford the objects, or cheaper replicas of the objects, we have to work very hard. The culture of things is not sustainable, our planet cannot keep everyone in the style of an average western household, much less in the style of a household that can afford a lot of luxury goods.

What do you consider to be a luxury? Is it the price tag? Is luxury defined by scarcity? Is it an emotional response to something indulgent? If so, what feels indulgent? If we can redefine luxury, perhaps more of us can get off the treadmill and enjoy living, rather than chasing after objects that will soon become obsolete. Here are ten things…

View original post 502 more words