Wild violets. Public domain photo courtesy of pd4pics.
Wild violets. Public domain photo courtesy of pd4pics.

Having just picked ‘wild greens’ — dandelion, violet, and plantain — and eaten them in a lovely lunch salad, I came across this post, quite synchronistically.

Perfect timing, and a gorgeous photo of just one of the many healthy meals you can make from … you got it … wild plants that grow around you.

This is one of several ‘reclaimed arts’ of the Wise Woman path, and a lovely way to connect with the spirit of and place where we live, as well as with the deep roots of our ancestors, who did just this very thing.

Thanks to Charlie for sharing this great intel on the humble and yet incredibly nutrient-rich dandelion and violet.

Have a look and see for yourself.

You’ll find more in a 2010 Priestess in Blue Jeans post I wrote about creating an edible lawn.

Big Love and Happy (Discerning) Foraging,
Jamie

Nourishing Words

Photo of spring salad with violet greens, dandelion greens, chives and violas

My eyes have been opened to the wild, edible greens growing right in my own yard, after attending Let Food Be Thy Medicine: Using Herbs in the Kitchen at Saturday’s Spring Herb and Garden Conference. Herbalist Darcey Blue French of Brighid’s Well Herbs inspired us all by mixing up several delicious recipes for tasting, including an herbal pesto and a weed salad.

I haven’t looked at my “weeds” the same way since, especially those white violets I was cursing a few weeks ago. In fact, I snipped both dandelion greens and violet leaves this evening, along with sorrel, spinach, mizuna and black-seeded Simpson lettuce from my garden. I topped off the greens with chive and viola flowers for a beautiful and delicious spring salad.

Violet leaves are a tonic for the body’s lymph system and are rich in vitamin C. They are a powerful blood purifier. They taste very green…

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